Southern National Bancorp
Southern National Bancorp of Virginia Inc (Form: 10-Q, Received: 05/14/2010 09:55:36)
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-Q

 

 

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE

SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Quarterly Period Ended March 31, 2010

Commission File No. 001-33037

 

 

SOUTHERN NATIONAL BANCORP OF VIRGINIA, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Virginia   20-1417448

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

6830 Old Dominion Drive

McLean, Virginia 22101

(Address of principal executive offices) (zip code)

(703) 893-7400

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    YES   x     NO   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    YES   ¨     NO   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definition of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b–2 of the Exchange Act:

 

Large accelerated filer   ¨    Accelerated filer   ¨
Non-accelerated filer   x   (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)    Smaller reporting company   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes   ¨     No   x

As of May 10, 2010, there were 11,590,212 shares of common stock outstanding.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

SOUTHERN NATIONAL BANCORP OF VIRGINIA, INC.

FORM 10-Q

March 31, 2010

INDEX

 

          PAGE
PART 1 - FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1 –

   Financial Statements   
  

Consolidated Balance Sheets as of March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009

   2
  

Consolidated Statements of Income and Comprehensive Income for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009

   3
  

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity for the three months ended March 31, 2010

   4
  

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009

   5
  

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

   6- 18

Item 2 –

   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations    19- 29

Item 3 –

   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk    30-32

Item 4 –

   Controls and Procedures    33
PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

Item 1 –

   Legal Proceedings    33

Item 1A –

   Risk Factors    33

Item 2 –

   Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds    33

Item 3 –

   Defaults Upon Senior Securities    33

Item 4 –

   (Removed and Reserved)    33

Item 5 –

   Other Information    33

Item 6 –

   Exhibits    34

Signatures

   35


Table of Contents

ITEM I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

PART I - FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SOUTHERN NATIONAL BANCORP OF VIRGINIA, INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

(dollars in thousands) (Unaudited)

 

     March 31,
2010
    December 31,
2009
 
ASSETS     

Cash and cash equivalents:

    

Cash and due from financial institutions

   $ 2,892      $ 2,858   

Interest-bearing deposits in other financial institutions

     18,054        5,212   
                

Total cash and cash equivalents

     20,946        8,070   
                

Securities available for sale, at fair value

     18,027        18,505   
                

Securities held to maturity, at amortized cost (fair value of $56,136 and $57,841, respectively)

     55,188        57,696   
                

Covered loans, net of unearned income

     104,204        111,989   

Non-covered loans, net of unearned income

     347,406        350,298   
                

Total loans, net of unearned income

     451,610        462,287   

Less allowance for loan losses

     (5,421     (5,172
                

Net loans

     446,189        457,115   
                

Stock in Federal Reserve Bank and Federal Home Loan Bank

     6,775        5,940   

Bank premises and equipment, net

     4,761        3,225   

Goodwill

     8,713        8,713   

Core deposit intangibles, net

     3,623        3,858   

FDIC indemnification asset

     19,164        19,408   

Bank-owned life insurance

     14,153        14,014   

Other real estate owned

     3,263        3,537   

Deferred tax assets, net

     4,523        4,559   

Other assets

     6,354        6,034   
                

Total assets

   $ 611,679      $ 610,674   
                
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY     

Noninterest-bearing demand deposits

   $ 33,509      $ 33,339   

Interest-bearing deposits:

    

NOW accounts

     15,424        17,499   

Money market accounts

     162,127        130,131   

Savings accounts

     4,906        4,398   

Time deposits

     233,256        270,424   
                

Total interest-bearing deposits

     415,713        422,452   
                

Total deposits

     449,222        455,791   
                

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase and other short-term borrowings

     21,248        22,020   

Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) advances

     35,000        30,000   

Other liabilities

     7,956        5,739   
                

Total liabilities

     513,426        513,550   
                

Commitments and contingencies (See Note 5)

     —          —     

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Preferred stock, $.01 par value. Authorized 5,000,000 shares;

     —          —     

no shares issued and outstanding

    

Common stock, $.01 par value. Authorized 45,000,000 shares; issued and outstanding, 11,590,212 shares at March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009

     116        116   

Additional paid in capital

     96,461        96,444   

Retained earnings

     5,094        4,053   

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

     (3,418     (3,489
                

Total stockholders’ equity

     98,253        97,124   
                

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 611,679      $ 610,674   
                

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

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SOUTHERN NATIONAL BANCORP OF VIRGINIA, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts) (Unaudited)

 

     For the Three Months Ended
March 31,
 
     2010     2009  

Interest and dividend income:

    

Interest and fees on loans

   $ 7,614      $ 4,604   

Interest and dividends on taxable securities

     734        782   

Interest and dividends on other earning assets

     43        40   
                

Total interest and dividend income

     8,391        5,426   
                

Interest expense:

    

Interest on deposits

     1,804        2,067   

Interest on borrowings

     327        313   
                

Total interest expense

     2,131        2,380   
                

Net interest income

     6,260        3,046   
                

Provision for loan losses

     1,300        480   
                

Net interest income after provision for loan losses

     4,960        2,566   
                

Noninterest income:

    

Account maintenance and deposit service fees

     241        132   

Income from bank-owned life insurance

     139        148   

Net gain (loss) on other real estate owned

     20        87   

Gain on sales of securities available for sale

     —          223   

Total other-than-temporary impairment losses

     (7     —     

Portion of loss recognized in other comprehensive income (before taxes)

     —          —     
                

Net credit impairment losses recognized in earnings

     (7     —     

Other

     147        4   
                

Total noninterest income

     540        594   
                

Noninterest expenses:

    

Salaries and benefits

     1,641        1,063   

Occupancy expenses

     542        387   

Furniture and equipment expenses

     154        121   

Amortization of core deposit intangible

     236        182   

Virginia franchise tax expense

     184        141   

FDIC assessment

     189        174   

Data processing expense

     155        80   

Telephone and communication expense

     119        65   

Amortization of FDIC indemnification asset

     244        —     

Other operating expenses

     514        220   
                

Total noninterest expenses

     3,978        2,433   
                

Income before income taxes

     1,522        727   

Income tax expense

     481        201   
                

Net income

   $ 1,041      $ 526   
                

Other comprehensive income (loss):

    

Unrealized gain on available for sale securities

   $ 61      $ 125   

Realized amount on securities sold, net

     —          (223

Non-credit component of other-than-temporary impairment on held-to-maturity securities

     76        —     

Accretion of amounts previously recorded upon transfer to held-to-maturity from available-for-sale

     (30     32   
                

Net unrealized gain (loss)

     107        (66

Tax effect

     (36     22   
                

Other comprehensive income (loss)

     71        (44
                

Comprehensive income

   $ 1,112      $ 482   
                

Earnings per share, basic and diluted

   $ 0.09      $ 0.08   
                

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

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SOUTHERN NATIONAL BANCORP OF VIRGINIA, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2010

(dollars in thousands, except per share amounts) (Unaudited)

 

     Common
Stock
   Additional
Paid in
Capital
   Retained
Earnings
   Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Loss
    Comprehensive
Income
   Total

Balance - January 1, 2010

   $ 116    $ 96,444    $ 4,053    $ (3,489      $ 97,124

Comprehensive income:

                

Net income

           1,041      $ 1,041      1,041

Stock-based compensation expense

        17              17

Change in unrealized gain on available for sale securities (net of tax, $20)

              41        41      41

Change in unrecognized loss on securities held to maturity for which a portion of OTTI has been recognized (net of tax, $16 and accretion, $30 and amounts recorded into other comprehensive income at transfer)

              30        30      30

Total comprehensive income

              $ 1,112   
                                          

Balance - March 31, 2010

   $ 116    $ 96,461    $ 5,094    $ (3,418      $ 98,253
                                      

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

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SOUTHERN NATIONAL BANCORP OF VIRGINIA, INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

FOR THE THREE MONTHS ENDED MARCH 31, 2010 AND 2009

(dollars in thousands) (Unaudited)

 

     2010     2009  

Operating activities:

    

Net income

   $ 1,041      $ 526   

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash and cash equivalents provided by operating activities:

    

Depreciation

     136        129   

Amortization of core deposit intangible

     236        182   

Amortization of FDIC indemnification asset

     244        —     

Other amortization , net

     50        (5

Provision for loan losses

     1,300        480   

Earnings on bank-owned life insurance

     (139     (148

Stock based compensation expense

     17        12   

Gain on securities

     —          (223

Impairment on securities

     7        —     

Net (gain) loss on other real estate owned

     (20     (87

Net (increase) decrease in other assets

     (404     98   

Net increase (decrease) in other liabilities

     2,218        (279
                

Net cash and cash equivalents provided by operating activities

     4,686        685   
                

Investing activities:

    

Proceeds from sales of securities available for sale

     —          9,852   

Proceeds from paydowns, maturities and calls of securities available for sale

     521        461   

Purchases of securities held to maturity

     —          (4,210

Proceeds from paydowns, maturities and calls of securities held to maturity

     2,598        3,429   

Loan originations and payments, net

     9,625        (16,545

Net increase in stock in Federal Reserve Bank and Federal Home Loan Bank

     (835     (147

Proceeds from sale of other real estate owned

     294        324   

Purchases of bank premises and equipment

     (1,672     (34
                

Net cash and cash equivalents provided (used) in investing activities

     10,531        (6,870
                

Financing activities:

    

Net decrease in deposits

     (6,569     (6,615

Proceeds from Federal Home Loan Bank advances

     5,000        —     

Net increase (decrease) in securities sold under agreement to repurchase and other short-term borrowings

     (772     2,489   
                

Net cash and cash equivalents used in financing activities

     (2,341     (4,126
                

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

     12,876        (10,311

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

     8,070        14,762   
                

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

   $ 20,946      $ 4,451   
                

Supplemental Disclosure of Cash Flow Information

    

Cash payments for:

    

Interest

   $ 2,141      $ 2,855   

Income taxes

     —          —     

Supplemental schedule of noncash investing and financing activities

    

Transfer from loans to other real estate owned

     —          280   

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

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SOUTHERN NATIONAL BANCORP OF VIRGINIA, INC.

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements (Unaudited)

March 31, 2010

 

1. ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Southern National Bancorp of Virginia, Inc. (“SNBV”) is a corporation formed on July 28, 2004 under the laws of the Commonwealth of Virginia and is the holding company for Sonabank, N. A. (“Sonabank”) a national bank chartered on April 14, 2005, under the laws of the United States of America. On January 1, 2009, Sonabank changed from a nationally chartered bank to a state chartered bank and moved its headquarters from Charlottesville to McLean, Virginia. The principal activities of Sonabank are to attract deposits and originate loans as permitted under applicable banking regulations. Sonabank operates 12 branches in Virginia located in Fairfax County (Reston, McLean and Fairfax), in Charlottesville, Warrenton (2), Leesburg (2), South Riding, Front Royal, New Market and Clifton Forge, and we also have a branch in Rockville, Maryland.

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Southern National Bancorp of Virginia, Inc. and its subsidiary. Significant inter-company accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

The unaudited consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U. S. generally accepted accounting principles (“U. S. GAAP”) for interim financial information and instructions for Form 10-Q and follow general practice within the banking industry. Accordingly, the unaudited consolidated financial statements do not include all of the information and footnotes required by U. S. GAAP for complete financial statements. However, in the opinion of management, all adjustments (consisting only of normal recurring accruals) necessary for a fair presentation of the results of the interim periods presented have been made. The results of operations for the interim periods are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the full year. For further information, refer to the consolidated financial statements and footnotes thereto included in SNBV’s Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of the consolidated financial statements in conformity with U. S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenue and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from these estimates. Material estimates that are particularly susceptible to significant change in the near term relate to the determination of the allowance for loan losses, the carrying value of investment securities, other than temporary impairment of investment securities, the valuation of goodwill and intangible assets, the FDIC indemnification asset, mortgage servicing rights, other real estate owned and deferred tax assets.

Reclassifications

Some items in the prior year financial statements were reclassified to conform to the current presentation.

 

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Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In June 2009, the FASB issued ASC 860-10, “Accounting for Transfers of Financial Assets—an amendment of ASC 860.” This statement removes the concept of a qualifying special-purpose entity from Statement 140 and removes the exception from applying ASC 810 (revised December 2003), Consolidation of Variable Interest Entities, to qualifying special-purpose entities. The objective in issuing this Statement is to improve the relevance, representational faithfulness, and comparability of the information that a reporting entity provides in its financial statements about a transfer of financial assets; the effects of a transfer on its financial position, financial performance, and cash flows; and a transferor’s continuing involvement, if any, in transferred financial assets. This Statement must be applied as of the beginning of each reporting entity’s first annual reporting period that begins after November 15, 2009, for interim periods within that first annual reporting period and for interim and annual reporting periods thereafter. The participating interest definition in this statement applies to transfers of government-guaranteed portions of loans, such as those guaranteed by the Small Business Administration (“SBA”). In this regard, if a seller transfers the guaranteed portion on an SBA loan at a premium, the seller is obligated by the SBA to refund the premium to the purchaser if the loan is repaid within 90 days of the transfer. Under this statement, this premium refund obligation is a form of recourse, which means that the transferred guaranteed portion the loan does not meet the definition of a participating interest for the 90-day period that the premium refund obligation exists. As a result, the transfer must be accounted for as a secured borrowing during this period. After the 90 day period, assuming the transferred guaranteed portion and the retained unguaranteed portion of the SBA loan now meet the definition of a participating interest, the transfer of the guaranteed portion can accounted for as a sale if all of the conditions for sale accounting in the statement are met. Adoption of this statement will result in a 90 day delay in recognizing the sale and gain on sale of the guaranteed portions of any SBA loans.

On June 12, 2009, the FASB issued ASC 810-10, Amendments to FASB Interpretation No. 46(R) . this guidance amends ASC 810 to replace the quantitative-based risks and rewards calculation for determining which enterprise, if any, has a controlling financial interest in a variable interest entity with a qualitative approach focused on identifying which enterprise has the power to direct the activities of a variable interest entity (VIE) that most significantly impact the entity’s economic performance and (1) the obligation to absorb losses of the entity or (2) the right to receive benefits from the entity. Unlike ASC 810, this Statement requires ongoing reconsideration of whether (1) an entity is a VIE and (2) an enterprise is the primary beneficiary of a VIE. It is expected that the amendments will result in more entities consolidating VIEs that previously were not consolidated The Statement will also require additional disclosures about an enterprise’s involvement in variable interest entities. This Statement must be applied as of the beginning of each reporting entity’s first annual reporting period that begins after November 15, 2009, for interim periods within that first annual reporting period and for interim and annual reporting periods thereafter. The impact of adoption was not material to our results of operations or financial position.

Recently Issued But Not Yet Effective Accounting Standards

Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 820, “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures”. The Financial Accounting Standards Board issued new accounting guidance under Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2010-06 that requires new disclosures and clarifies existing disclosure requirements about fair value measurement as set forth in ASC Subtopic 820-10. The objective of the new guidance is to improve these disclosures and increase transparency in financial reporting. Specifically, the new guidance requires:

A reporting entity to disclose separately the amounts of significant transfers in and out of Level 1 and Level 2 fair value measurements and describe the reasons for the transfers; and

 

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In the reconciliation for fair value measurements using significant unobservable inputs, a reporting entity should present separately information about purchases, sales, issuances and settlements.

In addition, the guidance clarifies the requirements of the following existing disclosures:

For purposes of reporting fair value measurement for each class of assets and liabilities, a reporting entity needs to use judgment in determining the appropriate classes of assets and liabilities; and

A reporting entity should provide disclosures about the valuation techniques and inputs used to measure fair value for both recurring and nonrecurring fair value measurements.

ASU 2010-06 is effective for interim and annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2009, except for the disclosures about purchases, sales, issuances, and settlements in the roll forward of activity in Level 3 fair value measurements. Those disclosures are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2010, and for interim periods within those fiscal years. Early application is permitted.

 

2. STOCK- BASED COMPENSATION

In 2004, the Board of Directors adopted a stock option plan that authorized the reservation of up to 302,500 shares of common stock and provided for the granting of stock options to certain directors, officers and employees. The options granted to officers and employees are incentive stock options and the options granted to non-employee directors are non-qualified stock options. The purpose of the plan is to afford key employees an incentive to remain in the employ of SNBV and to assist in the attracting and retaining of non-employee directors by affording them an opportunity to share in SNBV’s future success. Under the plan, the option’s price cannot be less than the fair market value of the stock on the grant date. The maximum term of the options is ten years and options granted may be subject to a graded vesting schedule.

SNBV granted 4,000 options during the first quarter of 2010. The fair value of each option granted is estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes options-pricing model. The following weighted-average assumptions were used to value options granted in the three months ended March 31, 2010:

 

Dividend yield

     0.00

Expected life

     10 years   

Expected volatility

     42.47

Risk-free interest rate

     3.74

Weighted average fair value per option granted

   $ 4.48   

 

   

We have paid no dividends.

 

   

Due to SNBV’s short existence, the volatility was estimated using historical volatility of comparative publicly traded financial institutions in the Virginia market combined with that of SNBV for periods approximating the expected option life.

 

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The risk-free interest rate was developed using the U. S. Treasury yield curve for periods equal to the expected life of the options on the grant date. An increase in the risk-free interest rate will increase stock compensation expense on future option grants.

For the three months ended March 31, 2010, stock-based compensation expense was $17 thousand compared to $12 thousand for the same period last year. As of March 31, 2010, unrecognized compensation expense associated with the stock options was $251 thousand which is expected to be recognized over a weighted average period of 4 years.

A summary of the activity in the stock option plan during the three months ended March 31, 2010 follows (dollars in thousands):

 

     Shares     Weighted
Average
Exercise
Price
   Weighted
Average
Remaining
Contractual
Term
   Aggregate
Intrinsic
Value

Options outstanding, beginning of period

   281,675      $ 8.56      

Granted

   4,000        7.61      

Forfeited

   (11,600     8.46      

Exercised

   —          —        
              

Options outstanding, end of period

   274,075      $ 8.55    6.6    $ 92
                        

Vested or expected to vest

   274,075      $ 8.55    6.6    $ 92

Exercisable at end of period

   187,665      $ 9.03    5.6    $ 18

 

3. SECURITIES

The amortized cost and fair value of securities available-for-sale were as follows (in thousands):

 

     Amortized    Gross Unrealized     Fair
March 31, 2010    Cost    Gains    Losses     Value

Residential government-sponsored mortgage-backed securities

   $ 4,850       $ (30   $ 4,820

SBA guaranteed loan pools

     12,989      168      (1     13,156

FHLMC preferred stock

     16      35      —          51
                            

Total

   $ 17,855    $ 203    $ (31   $ 18,027
                            
     Amortized    Gross Unrealized     Fair
December 31, 2009    Cost    Gains    Losses     Value

Residential government-sponsored mortgage-backed securities

   $ 4,967    $ —      $ (53   $ 4,914

SBA guaranteed loan pools

     13,412      151      (13     13,550

FHLMC preferred stock

     16      25      —          41
                            

Total

   $ 18,395    $ 176    $ (66   $ 18,505
                            

 

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The carrying amount and fair value of securities held-to-maturity were as follows (in thousands):

 

     Carrying    Gross Unrecognized     Fair
March 31, 2010    Amount    Gains    Losses     Value

Residential government-sponsored mortgage-backed securities

   $ 43,043    $ 1,215    $ (145   $ 44,113

Residential government-sponsored collateralized mortgage obligations

     302      16      —          318

Other residential collateralized mortgage obligations

     1,530      —        —          1,530

Trust preferred securities

     10,313      810      (948     10,175
                            
   $ 55,188    $ 2,041    $ (1,093   $ 56,136
                            
     Carrying    Gross Unrecognized     Fair
December 31, 2009    Amount    Gains    Losses     Value

Residential government-sponsored mortgage-backed securities

   $ 45,369    $ 1,173    $ (169   $ 46,373

Residential government-sponsored collateralized mortgage obligations

     398      21      —          419

Other residential collateralized mortgage obligations

     1,577      —        —          1,577

Trust preferred securities

     10,352      —        (880     9,472
                            
   $ 57,696    $ 1,194    $ (1,049   $ 57,841
                            

The fair value and carrying amount, if different, of debt securities as of March 31, 2010, by contractual maturity were as follows (in thousands). Securities not due at a single maturity date, primarily mortgage-backed securities and collateralized mortgage obligations, are shown separately.

 

     Held to Maturity    Available for Sale
     Carrying
Amount
   Fair Value    Fair Value    Amortized
Cost

Due in one to five years

   $ —      $ —      $ 249    $ 249

Due in five to ten years

     —        —        1,591      1,579

Due after ten years

     10,313      10,175      11,316      11,161

Residential government-sponsored mortgage-backed securities

     43,043      44,113      4,820      4,850

Residential government-sponsored collateralized mortgage obligations

     302      318      —        —  

Other residential collateralized mortgage obligations

     1,530      1,530      —        —  
                           

Total

   $ 55,188    $ 56,136    $ 17,976    $ 17,839
                           

During the three months ended March 31, 2010, there were no sales of securities. During the first quarter of 2009, we sold $9.9 million of available-for-sale mortgage-backed securities resulting in a gross gain of $223 thousand, and the tax provision related to the gain was $76 thousand.

Securities with a carrying amount of approximately $61.3 million and $40.1 million at March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, respectively, were pledged to secure public deposits, repurchase agreements and a line of credit for advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta (“FHLB”).

SNBV monitors the portfolio which is subject to liquidity needs, market rate changes and credit risk changes to see if adjustments are needed. At March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, some securities’ fair values were below cost. As outlined in the table below, there were securities with stated maturities totaling approximately $28.6 million in the portfolio that are considered temporarily impaired at March 31, 2010. Because the decline in fair value is attributable to changes in interest rates and illiquidity, and not credit quality, and because we do not have the intent to sell these securities and it is likely that we will not be required to sell the securities before their anticipated recovery, management does not consider these securities to be other-than-temporarily impaired as of March 31, 2010. All of these securities continue to perform according to the contractual terms and are investment grade. The following tables present information regarding securities in a continuous unrealized loss position as of March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009 (in thousands) by duration of time in a loss position:

 

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March 31, 2010                                  
     Less than 12 months     12 Months or More     Total  
Available for Sale    Fair value    Unrealized
Losses
    Fair value    Unrealized
Losses
    Fair value    Unrealized
Losses
 

Residential government-sponsored mortgage-backed securities

   $ 4,820    $ (30   $ —      $ —        $ 4,820    $ (30

SBA guaranteed loan pools

     463      (1     —        —          463      (1
                                             
   $ 5,283    $ (31   $ —      $ —        $ 5,283    $ (31
                                             
     Less than 12 months     12 Months or More     Total  
Held to Maturity    Fair value    Unrealized
Losses
    Fair value    Unrealized
Losses
    Fair value    Unrealized
Losses
 

Residential government-sponsored mortgage-backed securities

   $ 15,300    $ (145   $ —      $ —        $ 15,300    $ (145

Trust preferred securities

     —        —          7,983      (948     7,983      (948
                                             
   $ 15,300    $ (145   $ 7,983    $ (948   $ 23,283    $ (1,093
                                             
December 31, 2009                                  
     Less than 12 months     12 Months or More     Total  
Available for Sale    Fair value    Unrealized
Losses
    Fair value    Unrealized
Losses
    Fair value    Unrealized
Losses
 

Residential government-sponsored mortgage-backed securities

   $ 4,914    $ (53   $ —      $ —        $ 4,914    $ (53

SBA guaranteed loan pools

     819      (13     —        —          819      (13
                                             
   $ 5,733    $ (66   $ —      $ —        $ 5,733    $ (66
                                             
     Less than 12 months     12 Months or More     Total  
Held to Maturity    Fair value    Unrealized
Losses
    Fair value    Unrealized
Losses
    Fair value    Unrealized
Losses
 

Residential government-sponsored mortgage-backed securities

   $ 14,039    $ (169   $ —      $ —        $ 14,039    $ (169

Trust preferred securities

     —        —          8,094      (880     8,094      (880
                                             
   $ 14,039    $ (169   $ 8,094    $ (880   $ 22,133    $ (1,049
                                             

As of March 31, 2010, we owned pooled trust preferred securities as follows:

 

     Tranche    Ratings When
Purchased
   Current Ratings              Estimated
Fair
   Current
Defaults and
   % of Current
Defaults and
Deferrals
to Current
   

Sandler O’Neill (a)

Sterne Agee (b)

Estimated

Incremental

Defaults

Required to

    Previously
Recognized
Cumulative
Other Comprehensive
    

Security

   Level    Moody’s    Fitch    Moody’s    Fitch    Par Value    Book Value    Value    Deferrals    Collateral     Break Yield (1)     Loss (2)   
                              (in thousands)                         

Investment Grade:

                                    

ALESCO VII A1B

   Senior    Aaa    AAA    A3    A    $ 8,674    $ 7,716    $ 7,044    $ 176,056    28   $ 213,967  b    $ 328   

MMCF II B

   Senior Sub    A3    AA-    Baa2    BB      578      530      503      34,000    27     16,900  a      48   

MMCF III B

   Senior Sub    A3    A-    Baa3    B      702      685      436      27,000    23     22,100  a      17   
                                                    
                    9,954      8,931      7,983           $ 393   
                                                    
                                                              Cumulative
Other Comprehensive
Loss (3)
   Cumulative
OTTI Related to
Credit Loss (3)

Other Than Temporarily Impaired:

                           

TPREF FUNDING II

   Mezzanine    A1    A-    Caa3    C      1,500      478      562      115,100    33     —          780    $ 242

TRAP 2007-XII C1

   Mezzanine    A3    A    Ca    C      2,028      125      329      132,705    27     —          1,324      579

TRAP 2007-XIII D

   Mezzanine    NR    A-    NR    NR      2,032      —        —        260,250    35     —          —        2,032

MMC FUNDING XVIII

   Mezzanine    A3    A-    Ca    C      1,031      83      128      94,682    29     —          478      470

ALESCO V C1

   Mezzanine    A2    A    Ca    C      2,031      555      625      91,442    27     —          963      513

ALESCO XV C1

   Mezzanine    A3    A-    Ca    C      3,053      28      234      225,100    34     —          466      2,559

ALESCO XVI C

   Mezzanine    A3    A-    Ca    C      2,035      113      314      147,250    29     —          742      1,180
                                                        
                    13,710      1,382      2,192           $ 4,753    $ 7,575
                                                        

Total

                  $ 23,664    $ 10,313    $ 10,175             
                                                

 

(1) A break in yield for a given tranche means that defaults/deferrals have reached such a level that the tranche would not receive all of its contractual cash flows (principal and interest) by maturity (so not just a temporary interest shortfall, but an actual loss in yield on the investment). In other words, the magnitude of the defaults/deferrals has depleted all of the credit enhancement (excess interest and over-collateralization) beneath the given tranche. This represents additional defaults beyond those currently existing.
(2) Pre-tax, and represents unrealized losses at date of transfer from available-for-sale to held-to-maturity
(3) Pre-tax

We have evaluated each of these securities for potential impairment under ASC 325, and have reviewed each of the issues’ collateral participants using various techniques including the ratings provided in the Bank Financial Quarterly published by IDC Financial Publishing, Inc. We have also reviewed the interest and principal coverage of each of the tranches we own. In performing a detailed cash flow analysis of each security, we work with independent third parties to identify our best estimate of the cash flow estimated to be collected. If this estimate results in a present value of expected cash flows that is less than the amortized cost basis of a security (that is, credit loss exists), an other than temporary impairment (“OTTI”) is considered to have occurred. If there is no credit loss, any impairment is considered temporary. The cash flow analysis we performed included the following assumptions:

 

   

We assume that 2% of the remaining performing collateral will default or defer in the second quarter of 2010 and 50 basis points per annum thereafter.

 

   

We assume recoveries of 25% with a two year lag on all defaults and deferrals.

 

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We assume no prepayments for 10 years and then 1% per annum for the remaining life of the security.

 

   

Our securities have been modeled using the above assumptions by independent third parties using the forward LIBOR curve plus original spread to discount projected cash flows to present values.

These assumptions resulted in no OTTI recognition on the trust preferred securities during the first quarter of 2010.

We also own $1.9 million of SARM 2005-22 1A2. This residential collateralized mortgage obligation was downgraded from B to CCC by Standard and Poors in September 2009, and it was downgraded from BBB to CC by Fitch in August 2009. The fair market value is $1.5 million. We have evaluated this security for potential impairment and, based on our review of the trustee report, shock analysis and current information regarding delinquencies, nonperforming loans and credit support, determined that an OTTI does exist as of March 31, 2010 in the amount of $7 thousand. The assumptions used in the analysis included a 5% prepayment speed, 10% default rate, a 50% loss severity and an accounting yield of 4.75%.

The following table presents a roll forward of the credit losses for the trust preferred securities and the residential collateralized mortgage obligation recognized in earnings for the period ended March 31, 2010 (in thousands):

 

Amount of cumulative other-than-temporary impairment related to credit loss prior to January 1, 2010

   $ 7,714

Amounts related to credit loss for which an other-than-temporary impairment was not previously recognized

     7
      

Amount of cumulative other-than-temporary impairment related to credit loss as of March 31, 2010

   $ 7,721
      

 

4. LOANS AND ALLOWANCE FOR LOAN LOSSES

The following table summarizes the composition of our loan portfolio as of March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009:

 

     Covered
Loans
   Non-covered
Loans
    Total
Loans
    Covered
Loans
   Non-covered
Loans
    Total
Loans
 
     March 31, 2010     December 31, 2009  

Mortgage loans on real estate:

              

Commercial

   $ 21,204    $ 143,285      $ 164,489      $ 24,494    $ 146,295      $ 170,789   

Construction loans to residential builders

     —        2,486        2,486        —        5,436        5,436   

Other construction and land loans

     2,202      42,352        44,554        3,498      42,564        46,062   

Residential 1-4 family

     32,662      64,382        97,044        33,815      61,024        94,839   

Multi- family residential

     2,550      10,647        13,197        2,570      10,726        13,296   

Home equity lines of credit

     42,890      10,779        53,669        44,235      10,532        54,767   
                                              

Total real estate loans

     101,508      273,931        375,439        108,612      276,577        385,189   

Commercial loans

     2,524      71,162        73,686        3,184      70,757        73,941   

Consumer loans

     172      2,809        2,981        193      3,528        3,721   
                                              

Gross loans

     104,204      347,902        452,106        111,989      350,862        462,851   

Less unearned income on loans

     —        (496     (496     —        (564     (564
                                              

Loans, net of unearned income

   $ 104,204    $ 347,406      $ 451,610      $ 111,989    $ 350,298      $ 462,287   
                                              

The covered loans acquired in the Greater Atlantic transaction are and will continue to be subject to our internal and external credit review. As a result, if and when credit deterioration is noted subsequent to the acquisition date, such deterioration will be measured through our loss reserving methodology and a provision for credit losses will be charged to earnings with a partially offsetting noninterest income item reflecting the increase to the FDIC indemnification asset. There has been no provision recorded on covered loans since acquisition.

 

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The following summarizes activity in the allowance for loan losses for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009 (in thousands):

 

     2010     2009  

Balance, beginning of period

   $ 5,172      $ 4,218   

Provision charged to operations

     1,300        480   

Recoveries credited to allowance

     59        2   
                

Total

     6,531        4,700   

Loans charged off

     (1,110     (240
                

Balance, end of period

   $ 5,421      $ 4,460   
                

Non-covered loans identified as impaired in accordance with ASC 310 totaled $7.0 million with allocated allowance for loan losses in the amount of $609 thousand as of March 31, 2010. This compares to $4.2 million of impaired loans with allocated allowance for loan losses in the amount of $554 thousand at December 31, 2009. Nonaccrual loans were $3.8 million and $4.2 million at March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, respectively. At March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, there were no loans past due 90 days or more and accruing interest.

Covered loans identified as impaired in accordance with ASC 310 totaled $4.9 million as of March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009. Nonaccrual loans were $3.3 million and $5.1 million at March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, respectively. At March 31, 2010, there were two loans totaling $105 thousand that were past due 90 days or more and accruing interest, and at December 31, 2009, there were no loans past due 90 days or more and accruing interest.

 

5. FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS WITH OFF-BALANCE SHEET RISK

SNBV is a party to financial instruments with off-balance sheet risk in the normal course of business to meet the financing needs of its customers. These financial instruments include commitments to extend credit and standby letters of credit. These instruments involve elements of credit and funding risk in excess of the amount recognized in the consolidated balance sheet. Letters of credit are written conditional commitments issued by SNBV to guarantee the performance of a customer to a third party. The credit risk involved in issuing letters of credit is essentially the same as that involved in extending loans to customers. We had letters of credit outstanding totaling $6.5 million and $3.8 million as of March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, respectively.

Our exposure to credit loss in the event of nonperformance by the other party to the financial instruments for commitments to extend credit and letters of credit is based on the contractual amount of these instruments. We use the same credit policies in making commitments and conditional obligations as we do for on-balance sheet instruments.

Commitments to extend credit are agreements to lend to a customer as long as there is no violation of any condition established in the contract. Commitments are made predominately for adjustable rate loans, and generally have fixed expiration dates of up to three months or other termination clauses and usually require payment of a fee. Since many of the commitments may expire without being completely drawn upon, the total commitment amounts do not necessarily represent future cash requirements. We evaluate each customer’s creditworthiness on a case-by-case basis.

 

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At March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, we had unfunded lines of credit and undisbursed construction loan funds totaling $126.8 million and $121.7 million, respectively. Our approved loan commitments were $6.8 million and $850 thousand at March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, respectively.

 

6. EARNINGS PER SHARE

The following is a reconciliation of the denominators of the basic and diluted earnings per share (“EPS”) computations (dollars in thousands, except per share data):

 

     Income
(Numerator)
   Weighted
Average
Shares
(Denominator)
   Per
Share
Amount

For the three months ended March 31, 2010

        

Basic EPS

   $ 1,041    11,590    $ 0.09

Effect of dilutive stock options and warrants

     —      3      —  
                  

Diluted EPS

   $ 1,041    11,593    $ 0.09
                  

For the three months ended March 31, 2009

        

Basic EPS

   $ 526    6,799    $ 0.08

Effect of dilutive stock options and warrants

     —      —        —  
                  

Diluted EPS

   $ 526    6,799    $ 0.08
                  

There were 414,766 anti-dilutive options and warrants during the three months ended March 31, 2010, and there were 397,925 anti-dilutive options and warrants during the three months ended March 31, 2009.

 

7. FAIR VALUE

ASC 820-10 establishes a fair value hierarchy which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. The standard describes three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value:

Level 1: Quoted prices (unadjusted) for identical assets or liabilities in active markets that the entity has the ability to access as of the measurement date

Level 2: Significant other observable inputs other than Level 1 prices such as quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities; quoted prices in markets that are not active; or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data

Level 3: Significant unobservable inputs that reflect a reporting entity’s own assumptions about the assumptions that market participants would use in pricing an asset or liability

The following is a description of the valuation methodologies used for instruments measured at fair value, as well as the general classification of such instruments pursuant to the valuation hierarchy:

Securities Available for Sale

Where quoted prices are available in an active market, securities are classified within level 1 of the valuation hierarchy. Level 1 securities would include highly liquid government bonds, mortgage products and exchange traded equities. If quoted market prices are not available, then

 

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fair values are estimated by using pricing models, quoted prices of securities with similar characteristics, or discounted cash flow. Level 2 securities would include U. S. agency securities, mortgage-backed securities, obligations of states and political subdivisions and certain corporate, asset-backed and other securities. In certain cases where there is limited activity or less transparency around inputs to the valuation, securities are classified within level 3 of the valuation hierarchy. Currently, all of SNBV’s available-for-sale securities are considered to be level 2 securities.

Assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis are summarized below:

 

          Fair Value Measurements Using
(dollars in thousands)    Total at
March 31, 2010
   Quoted Prices in
Active Markets for
Identical Assets
(Level 1)
   Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level 2)
   Significant
Unobservable
Inputs

(Level 3)

Financial assets:

           

Available for sale securities

           

Residential government-sponsored mortgage-backed securities

   $ 4,820    $ —      $ 4,820    $ —  

SBA guaranteed loan pools

     13,156      —        13,156      —  

FHLMC preferred stock

     51      —        51      —  
                           

Total available-for-sale securities

   $ 18,027    $ —      $ 18,027    $ —  
                           
          Fair Value Measurements Using
(dollars in thousands)    Total at
December 31, 2009
   Quoted Prices in
Active Markets for
Identical Assets
(Level 1)
   Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level 2)
   Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
(Level 3)

Financial assets:

           

Available for sale securities

           

Residential government-sponsored mortgage-backed securities

   $ 4,914    $ —      $ 4,914    $ —  

SBA guaranteed loan pools

     13,550      —        13,550      —  

FHLMC preferred stock

     41      —        41      —  
                           

Total available-for-sale securities

   $ 18,505    $ —      $ 18,505    $ —  
                           

Assets and Liabilities Measured on a Non-recurring Basis:

Trust Preferred Securities Classified as Held-to-Maturity

Management utilized guidance in ASC 820-10 to value these securities. The base input in calculating fair value is a Bloomberg Fair Value Index yield curve for single issuer trust preferred securities which correspond to the ratings of the securities we own. We also use composite rating indices to fill in the gaps where the bank rating indices did not correspond to the ratings in our portfolio. When a bank index that matches the rating of our security is not available, we used the bank index that most closely matches the rating, adjusted by the spread between the composite index that most closely matches the security’s rating and the composite index with a rating that matches the bank index used. Then, we use the adjusted index yield, which is further adjusted by a liquidity premium, as the discount rate to be used in the calculation of the present value of the same cash flows used to evaluate the securities for OTTI. The liquidity premiums were derived in consultation with a securities advisor. The liquidity premiums we used ranged from .25% to 5%, and the adjusted discount rates ranged from 6.92% to 16.04%. Due to current market conditions as well as the limited trading activity of these securities, the market value of the securities is highly sensitive to assumption changes and market volatility. We have determined that our trust preferred securities are classified within Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy.

 

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Based on our analysis in the first quarter of 2010, there were no OTTI charges on trust preferred securities. There were OTTI charges on trust preferred securities totaling $7.6 million during 2009.

Other Residential Collateralized Mortgage Obligation Classified as Held-to Maturity

The fair value was estimated within Level 2 fair value hierarchy, as the fair value is based on either pricing models, quoted market prices of securities with similar characteristics, or discounted cash flows. We have evaluated this security for potential impairment and, based on our review of the trustee report, shock analysis and current information regarding delinquencies, nonperforming loans and credit support. The assumptions used in the analysis included a 5% prepayment speed, 10% default rate, a 50% loss severity and an accounting yield of 4.75%. Based on this analysis, an OTTI existed as of March 31, 2010 in the amount of $7 thousand. There was an OTTI on this security in the amount $139 thousand as of December 31, 2009.

Other Securities Classified as Held-to-Maturity

Where quoted prices are available in an active market, securities are classified within level 1 of the valuation hierarchy. Level 1 securities would include highly liquid government bonds, mortgage products and exchange traded equities. If quoted market prices are not available, then fair values are estimated by using pricing models, quoted prices of securities with similar characteristics, or discounted cash flow. Level 2 securities would include U. S. agency securities, mortgage-backed securities, obligations of states and political subdivisions and certain corporate, asset-backed and other securities. In certain cases where there is limited activity or less transparency around inputs to the valuation, securities are classified within level 3 of the valuation hierarchy. Currently, all of SNBV’s other securities classified as held-to-maturity are considered to be level 2 securities.

Impaired Loans

ASC 820-10 applies to loans measured for impairment using the practical expedients permitted by ASC 310 at the fair value of the loan’s collateral (if the loan is collateral dependent). Fair value of the loan’s collateral, when the loan is dependent on collateral, is determined by appraisals or independent valuation which is then adjusted for the cost related to liquidation of the collateral. Fair value is classified as Level 3 in the fair value hierarchy. Non-covered loans identified as impaired in accordance with ASC 310 totaled $7.0 million as of March 31, 2010 with an allocated allowance for loan losses totaling $609 thousand compared to a carrying amount of $4.2 million with an allocated allowance for loan losses totaling $554 thousand at December 31, 2009. Charge-offs related to the impaired loans at March 31, 2010 totaled $730 thousand during the first quarter of 2010. Charge-offs related to impaired loans totaled $40 thousand during the three months ended March 31, 2009. Covered loans identified as impaired at March 31, 2010, totaled $4.9 million.

Other Real Estate Owned (OREO)

OREO is evaluated at the time of acquisition and recorded at fair value as determined by independent appraisal or internal market evaluation less cost to sell. OREO is further evaluated quarterly for any additional impairment. Fair value is classified as Level 3 in the fair value hierarchy. The total amount of OREO was $3.3 million at March 31, 2010. At March 31, 2010, the amount of non-covered OREO was $2.8 million and covered OREO was $467 thousand.

 

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Assets measured at fair value on a non-recurring basis are summarized below:

 

          Fair Value Measurements Using
(dollars in thousands)    Total at
March 31, 2010
   Quoted Prices in
Active Markets for
Identical Assets
(Level 1)
   Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level 2)
   Significant
Unobservable
Inputs

(Level 3)

Trust preferred securities, held to maturity

   $ 10,175    $ —      $ —      $ 10,175

Other residential collateralized mortgage obligations

     1,530      —        1,530      —  

Impaired non-covered loans

     6,343      —        —        6,343

Impaired covered loans

     4,933      —        —        4,933

Non-covered other real estate owned

     2,796      —        —        2,796

Covered other real estate owned

     467      —        —        467
          Fair Value Measurements Using
(dollars in thousands)    Total at
December 31, 2009
   Quoted Prices in
Active Markets for
Identical Assets
(Level 1)
   Significant
Other
Observable
Inputs
(Level 2)
   Significant
Unobservable
Inputs
(Level 3)

Trust preferred securities, held to maturity

   $ 9,472    $ —      $ —      $ 9,472

Other residential collateralized mortgage obligations

     1,577      —        1,577      —  

Impaired non-covered loans

     3,636      —        —        3,636

Impaired covered loans

     4,933      —        —        4,933

Non-covered other real estate owned

     2,797      —        —        2,797

Covered other real estate owned

     740      —        —        740

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The carrying amount and estimated fair values of financial instruments were as follows (in thousands):

 

     March 31, 2010    December 31, 2009
     Carrying
Amount
   Fair
Value
   Carrying
Amount
   Fair
Value

Financial assets:

           

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 20,946    $ 20,946    $ 8,070    $ 8,070

Securities available for sale

     18,027      18,027      18,505      18,505

Securities held to maturity

     55,188      56,136      57,696      57,841

Stock in Federal Reserve Bank and Federal

           

Home Loan Bank

     6,775      n/a      5,940      n/a

Net uncovered loans

     341,985      342,040      345,126      348,978

Net covered loans

     104,204      104,224      111,989      111,989

Accrued interest receivable

     2,158      2,158      2,167      2,167

FDIC indemnification asset

     19,164      19,164      19,408      19,408

Financial liabilities:

           

Deposits:

           

Demand deposits

     48,933      48,933      50,838      50,838

Money market and savings accounts

     167,033      167,033      134,529      134,529

Certificates of deposit

     233,256      234,912      270,424      272,073

Securities sold under agreements to repurchase and other short-term borrowings

     21,248      21,248      22,020      22,020

FHLB advances

     35,000      35,160      30,000      30,441

Accrued interest payable

     743      743      753      753

Carrying amount is the estimated fair value for cash and cash equivalents, accrued interest receivable and payable, demand deposits, short-term debt, and variable rate loans that reprice frequently and fully. For fixed rate loans or deposits and for variable rate loans with infrequent repricing or repricing limits, fair value is based on discounted cash flows using current market

 

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rates applied to the estimated life. It was not practicable to determine the fair value of Federal Reserve Bank and Federal Home Loan Bank stock due to restrictions placed on its transferability. Fair value of long-term debt is based on current rates for similar financing. The FDIC indemnification asset was measured at estimated fair value on the date of acquisition. The fair value was determined by discounting estimated future cash flows using the long-term risk free rate plus a premium. Subsequent additions to the asset are valued at par as it is anticipated that these amounts will be shortly received. The fair value of off-balance-sheet items is not considered material.

 

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ITEM 2 – MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Management’s discussion and analysis is presented to aid the reader in understanding and evaluating the financial condition and results of operations of SNBV. This discussion and analysis should be read with the consolidated financial statements, the footnotes thereto, and the other financial data included in this report and in our annual report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009. Results of operations for the three month period ended March 31, 2010 are not necessarily indicative of results that may be attained for any other period.

SPECIAL CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

Statements and financial discussion and analysis contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q that are not statements of historical fact constitute forward-looking statements made pursuant to the safe harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements are based on assumptions and involve a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond our control. The words “believe,” “may,” “should,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “continue,” “would,” “could,” “hope,” “might,” “assume,” “objective,” “seek,” “plan,” “strive” and similar words, or the negatives of these words, are intended to identify forward-looking statements.

Many possible events or factors could affect our future financial results and performance and could cause our actual results to differ materially from the expectations of future results we express or imply in any forward-looking statements. In addition to the Risk Factors previously disclosed in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009, factors that could contribute to those differences include, but are not limited to:

 

   

our limited operating history;

 

   

changes in the strength of the United States economy in general and the local economies in our market areas adversely affect our customers and their ability to transact profitable business with us, including the ability of our borrowers to repay their loans according to their terms or a change in the value of the related collateral;

 

   

changes in the availability of funds resulting in increased costs or reduced liquidity;

 

   

our reliance on brokered deposits;

 

   

a deterioration or downgrade in the credit quality and credit agency ratings of the securities in our securities portfolio;

 

   

impairment concerns and risks related to our investment portfolio of collateralized mortgage obligations, agency mortgage-backed securities and pooled trust preferred securities;

 

   

the incurrence and possible impairment of goodwill associated with an acquisition and possible adverse short-term effects on our results of operations;

 

   

increased credit risk in our assets and increased operating risk caused by a material change in commercial, consumer and/or real estate loans as a percentage of our total loan portfolio;

 

   

the concentration of our loan portfolio in loans collateralized by real estate;

 

   

our level of construction and land development and commercial real estate loans;

 

   

changes in the levels of loan prepayments and the resulting effects on the value of our loan portfolio;

 

   

the failure of assumptions underlying the establishment of and provisions made to the allowance for loan losses;

 

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our ability to expand and grow our business and operations, including the establishment of additional branches and acquisition of additional branches and banks, and our ability to realize the cost savings and revenue enhancements we expect from such activities;

 

   

changes in interest rates and market prices, which could reduce our net interest margins, asset valuations and expense expectations;

 

   

increased competition for deposits and loans adversely affecting rates and terms;

 

   

increases in FDIC deposit insurance premiums and assessments;

 

   

the continued service of key management personnel;

 

   

increased asset levels and changes in the composition of assets and the resulting impact on our capital levels and regulatory capital ratios;

 

   

our ability to acquire, operate and maintain cost effective and efficient systems without incurring unexpectedly difficult or expensive but necessary technological changes; and

 

   

fiscal and governmental policies of the United States federal government.

Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of performance or results. A forward-looking statement may include a statement of the assumptions or bases underlying the forward-looking statement. We believe we have chosen these assumptions or bases in good faith and that they are reasonable. We caution you, however, that assumptions or bases almost always vary from actual results, and the differences between assumptions or bases and actual results can be material. When considering forward-looking statements, you should keep in mind the risk factors and other cautionary statements in this prospectus. These statements speak only as of the date of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. Except as required by applicable law, we undertake no obligation to update publicly these statements in light of new information or future events.

OVERVIEW

Southern National Bancorp of Virginia, Inc. (“SNBV”) is a corporation formed on July 28, 2004 under the laws of the Commonwealth of Virginia and is the holding company for Sonabank (“Sonabank”) a Virginia state bank. Sonabank was originally chartered as a national bank under the laws of the United States of America on April 14, 2005. On January 1, 2009, Sonabank converted from a nationally chartered bank to a state chartered bank and moved its headquarters from Charlottesville to McLean, Virginia. Sonabank is now regulated by the State Corporation Commission of Virginia and the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. Sonabank conducts full-service banking operations in Charlottesville, Clifton Forge, Leesburg, Warrenton, New Market, Front Royal, South Riding and Fairfax County in Virginia and in Rockville, Maryland. We also have loan production offices in Charlottesville, Fredericksburg, Warrenton and Richmond in Virginia. We have administrative offices in Warrenton and an executive office in Georgetown, Washington, D.C where senior management is located.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Net Income

Net income for the quarter ended March 31, 2010 was $1.0 million compared to $526 thousand during the first quarter of 2009.

 

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Net Interest Income

Our operating results depend primarily on our net interest income, which is the difference between interest and dividend income on interest-earning assets such as loans and investments, and interest expense on interest-bearing liabilities such as deposits and borrowings.

Net interest income for the three months ended March 31, 2010 was $6.3 million compared to $3.0 million for the same period last year. Average interest-earning assets for the three months ended March 31, 2010 increased $153.7 million over the same period in 2009. Average loans outstanding increased by $150.1 million in the first quarter of 2010 compared to the first quarter of 2009. Average investment securities increased by $7.3 million in the quarter ended March 31, 2010, compared to the same period last year. The average balance of other earning assets, primarily interest-earning accounts at the Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond (FRB) and the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta (FHLB), decreased from $18.5 million during the first quarter of 2009 to $14.8 million during the first quarter of 2010. The average yield on interest-earning assets increased from 5.57% in 2009 to 6.20% in 2010. Average interest-bearing liabilities for the three months ended March 31, 2010 increased $139.0 million compared to the same period in 2009. Average interest-bearing deposits increased by $135.5 million, while average borrowings increased by $3.5 million compared to the first quarter of 2009. The average cost of interest-bearing liabilities decreased from 2.85% in 2009 to 1.81% in 2010. The interest rate spread for the three months ended March 31, 2010 increased from 2.72% to 4.39% compared to the same period last year. The net interest margin for the three months ended March 31, 2010 increased to 4.62% from 3.12% compared to the same period last year.

The significant improvement in the net interest income was attributable to:

 

   

The impact of the Greater Atlantic and Millennium transactions. The accretion of the discount on the Greater Atlantic Bank loans contributed $667 thousand to first quarter net interest income.

 

   

The bottoming of the decline in interest rates in the first quarter of 2009. The prime rate was 3.25% at the end of the first quarter of 2009 and it remained at that level at the end of the first quarter of 2010.

 

   

Our practice of establishing floor rates on loans as they mature or roll over notwithstanding the index rates. On non-SBA loans we have been establishing floors ranging from 6% to 7  1 / 2 %.

 

   

Most of the CDs which were outstanding at the end of the first quarter of 2009 have matured and have been replaced with new CDs at lower rates. The average rate on our CDs at the end of the first quarter of 2009 was 3.05% compared to 1.80% at the end of the first quarter of 2010.

 

   

We have reduced rates on deposit accounts as much as we can without harming relationships. Moreover, we are concerned with the probability that rates will rise and to the extent possible have positioned ourselves for this eventuality.

 

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The following table details average balances of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities, the amount of interest earned/paid on such assets and liabilities, and the yield/rate for the periods indicated:

 

     Average Balance Sheets and Net Interest
Analysis For the Three Months Ended
 
     3/31/2010     3/31/2009  
     Average
Balance
    Interest
Income/
Expense
   Yield/
Rate
    Average
Balance
    Interest
Income/
Expense
   Yield/
Rate
 
     (Dollar amounts in thousands)  

Assets

              

Interest-earning assets:

              

Loans, net of unearned income (1) (2)

   $ 459,267      $ 7,614    6.72   $ 309,188      $ 4,604    6.04

Investment securities

     74,872        734    3.92     67,528        782    4.63

Other earning assets

     14,785        43    1.18     18,547        40    0.87
                                  

Total earning assets

     548,924        8,391    6.20     395,263        5,426    5.57
                      

Allowance for loan losses

     (5,293          (4,258     

Total non-earning assets

     72,054             42,112        
                          

Total assets

   $ 615,685           $ 433,117        
                          

Liabilities and stockholders’ equity

              

Interest-bearing liabilities:

              

NOW accounts

   $ 15,227        12    0.31   $ 7,778        2    0.10

Money market accounts

     146,425        633    1.75     50,665        200    1.60

Savings accounts

     4,669        7    0.64     2,019        1    0.10

Time deposits

     256,521        1,152    1.82     226,831        1,864    3.33
                                  

Total interest-bearing deposits

     422,842        1,804    1.73     287,293        2,067    2.92

Borrowings

     55,463        327    2.39     52,008        313    2.44
                                  

Total interest-bearing liabilities

     478,305        2,131    1.81     339,301        2,380    2.85
                      

Noninterest-bearing liabilities:

              

Demand deposits

     33,540             22,845        

Other liabilities

     6,741             1,743        
                          

Total liabilities

     518,586             363,889        

Stockholders’ equity

     97,099             69,228        
                          

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 615,685           $ 433,117        
                          

Net interest income

     $ 6,260        $ 3,046   
                      

Interest rate spread

        4.39        2.72

Net interest margin

        4.62        3.12

 

(1) Includes loan fees in both interest income and the calculation of the yield on loans.
(2) Calculations include non-accruing loans in average loan amounts outstanding.

Provision for Loan Losses

The provision for loan losses is a current charge to earnings made in order to increase the allowance for loan losses to a level deemed appropriate by management based on an evaluation of the loan portfolio, current economic conditions, changes in the nature and volume of lending, historical loan experience and other known internal and external factors affecting loan collectability. Our loan loss allowance is calculated by segmenting the loan portfolio by loan type and applying risk factors to each segment. The risk factors are determined by considering peer data, internal and external factors affecting loan collectability, as well as applying management’s judgment.

The provision for loan losses charged to operations for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009 were $1.3 million and $480 thousand, respectively. Net charge offs during the quarter ended March 31, 2010 were $1.1 million compared to $238 thousand during the same quarter last year. The charge-offs were related to various credits including one non-real estate related SBA loan, one real estate related SBA loan, one residential mortgage, two commercial and industrial loans, one consumer loan and one commercial real estate mortgage. Two of the largest charge offs involved a $400 thousand charge off on a loan to a commercial and industrial borrower and a $330 thousand charge off on a loan to a commercial real estate borrower. The charge off on our

 

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loan to the commercial and industrial borrower is based on an updated first quarter evaluation of collateral securing the loan. The charge off on our loan to the commercial real estate borrower results from a revaluation of the collateral securing this loan based on a bona fide offer to acquire the collateral from a third party.

Noninterest Income

The following table presents the major categories on noninterest income for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009:

 

     For the Three Months  Ended
March 31,
 
     2010     2009    Change  
     (dollars in thousands)  

Account maintenance and deposit service fees

   $ 241      $ 132    $ 109   

Income from bank-owned life insurance

     139        148      (9

Net gain (loss) on other real estate owned

     20        87      (67

Net impairment losses recognized in earnings

     (7     —        (7

Gain on securities

     —          223      (223

Other

     147        4      143   
                       

Total noninterest income

   $ 540      $ 594    $ (54
                       

Noninterest income was $540 thousand during the first quarter of 2010, compared to $594 thousand during the same quarter of 2009. Noninterest income for the first quarter of 2009 benefitted from a gain on securities of $223 thousand and gain on other real estate owned (“OREO”) of $87 thousand. Account maintenance and deposit service fees have increased from $132 thousand in the quarter ended March 31, 2009 to $241 thousand for the first quarter of 2010 primarily because of the increase in deposit accounts resulting from the Greater Atlantic and Millennium acquisitions. The increase in other noninterest income is primarily due to fees earned on short-term letters of credit.

Noninterest Expense

The following table presents the major categories on noninterest expense for the three months ended March 31, 2010 and 2009:

 

     For the Three Months Ended
March 31,
     2010    2009    Change
     (dollars in thousands)

Salaries and benefits

   $ 1,641    $ 1,063    $ 578

Occupancy expenses

     542      387      155

Furniture and equipment expenses

     154      121      33

Amortization of core deposit intangible

     236      182      54

Virginia franchise tax expense

     184      141      43

FDIC assessment

     189      174      15

Data processing expense

     155      80      75

Telephone and communication expense

     119      65      54

Amortization of FDIC indemnification asset

     244      —        244

Other operating expenses

     514      220      294
                    

Total noninterest expense

   $ 3,978    $ 2,433    $ 1,545
                    

 

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Noninterest expense was $4.0 million for the first quarter of 2010 compared to $2.4 million for the first quarter of 2009. The amortization of the FDIC indemnification asset added $244 thousand to 2010 first quarter noninterest expenses and the amortization of the Greater Atlantic Bank core deposit intangible added $50 thousand. Also, as a result of the Greater Atlantic and Millennium transactions, compensation expense has increased $578 thousand in the first quarter of 2010 compared to the same period last year. Full-time equivalent employees increased from 66 at March 31, 2009 to 103 at March 31, 2010. Occupancy and equipment expenses have also increased $188 thousand, and data processing, online banking and ATM-related expenses are $140 thousand more than in the first quarter of 2009. Virginia franchise tax expense has increased $43 thousand in the quarter ended March 31, 2010 compared to the same period last year because of the increase in deposits during 2009. Consulting fees have increased to $50 thousand in the first quarter of 2010 from $5 thousand in the first quarter of 2009 primarily due to the Greater Atlantic acquisition.

Despite the costs associated with the Greater Atlantic acquisition and the Millennium branch acquisition, noninterest expenses were well controlled and our efficiency ratio improved from 73.1% to 58.6% in the first quarter of 2010 compared to the same period last year.

FINANCIAL CONDITION

Balance Sheet Overview

Total assets of Southern National Bancorp of Virginia were $611.7 million as of March 31, 2010 up from $610.7 million as of December 31, 2009. Net loans receivable decreased from $457.1 million at the end of 2009 to $446.2 million at March 31, 2010. Two large loans in the Sonabank portfolio totaling approximately $6.4 million were paid off, one on a project completed and refinanced and the other as a result of our borrower being acquired by a larger company. There were also principal repayments in the covered portfolio acquired in the Greater Atlantic transaction, including large repayments on three loans totaling approximately $3.2 million. The increase in bank premises and equipment was due to the purchase of certain fixed assets of Greater Atlantic from the FDIC in the amount of $1.6 million.

Total deposits were $449.2 million at March 31, 2010 compared to $455.8 million at December 31, 2009. The decline was almost entirely in brokered deposits which fell from $70.0 million as of December 31, 2009 to $65.0 million at March 31, 2010. Noninterest-bearing deposits were $33.5 million at March 31, 2010 and $33.3 million at December 31, 2009.

 

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Loan Portfolio

As part of the Greater Atlantic acquisition, the Bank and the FDIC entered into a loss sharing agreement on approximately $143.4 million (contractual basis) of Greater Atlantic Bank’s assets. The Bank will share in the losses on the loans and foreclosed loan collateral with the FDIC as specified in the loss sharing agreement; we refer to these assets collectively as “covered assets.” Loans that are not covered in the loss sharing agreement are referred to as “non-covered loans.”

The following table summarizes the composition of our loan portfolio as of March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009:

 

     Covered
Loans
   Non-covered
Loans
    Total
Loans
    Covered
Loans
   Non-covered
Loans
    Total
Loans
 
     March 31, 2010     December 31, 2009  

Mortgage loans on real estate:

              

Commercial

   $ 21,204    $ 143,285      $ 164,489      $ 24,494    $ 146,295      $ 170,789   

Construction loans to residential builders

     —        2,486        2,486        —        5,436        5,436   

Other construction and land loans

     2,202      42,352        44,554        3,498      42,564        46,062   

Residential 1-4 family

     32,662      64,382        97,044        33,815      61,024        94,839   

Multi- family residential

     2,550      10,647        13,197        2,570      10,726        13,296   

Home equity lines of credit

     42,890      10,779        53,669        44,235      10,532        54,767   
                                              

Total real estate loans

     101,508      273,931        375,439        108,612      276,577        385,189   

Commercial loans

     2,524      71,162        73,686        3,184      70,757        73,941   

Consumer loans

     172      2,809        2,981        193      3,528        3,721   
                                              

Gross loans

     104,204      347,902        452,106        111,989      350,862        462,851   

Less unearned income on loans

     —        (496     (496     —        (564     (564
                                              

Loans, net of unearned income

   $ 104,204    $ 347,406      $ 451,610      $ 111,989    $ 350,298      $ 462,287   
                                              

Asset Quality

We will generally place a loan on nonaccrual status when it becomes 90 days past due. Loans will also be placed on nonaccrual status in cases where we are uncertain whether the borrower can satisfy the contractual terms of the loan agreement. Cash payments received while a loan is categorized as nonaccrual will be recorded as a reduction of principal as long as doubt exists as to future collections.

We maintain appraisals on loans secured by real estate, particularly those categorized as nonperforming loans and potential problem loans. In instances where appraisals reflect reduced collateral values, we make an evaluation of the borrower’s overall financial condition to determine the need, if any, for possible specific allocations or write-down to their net realizable values. If foreclosure occurs, we record other real estate owned at the lower of our recorded investment in the loan or fair value less our estimated costs to sell.

Our loss and delinquency experience on our loan portfolio has been limited by a number of factors, including our underwriting standards and the relatively short period of time since the loans were originated. Whether our loss and delinquency experience in the area of our portfolio will increase significantly depends upon the value of the real estate securing loans and economic factors such as the overall economy of the region.

Non-covered Loans and Assets

Non-covered loans identified as impaired in accordance with ASC 310 totaled $7.0 million with allocated allowance for loan losses in the amount of $609 thousand as of March 31, 2010. This compares to $4.2 million of impaired loans with allocated allowance for loan losses in the

 

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amount of $554 thousand at December 31, 2009. Non-covered nonaccrual loans were $3.8 million and $4.2 million at March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, respectively. At March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, there were no loans past due 90 days or more and accruing interest.

Non-covered nonperforming assets decreased from $7.0 million at December 31, 2009 to $6.6 million at March 31, 2010.

The bulk of our other real estate owned balance continues to be comprised of one property, which contains 33 finished 2 to 4 acre lots in Culpeper. We took a deed in lieu of foreclosure in September 2007. There are no new developments on that property. We continue to monitor the fair value of this property to ensure our carrying value is realizable.

We have an internal loan review process and a loan committee which provide on-going monitoring to identify and address issues with problem loans. We believe the allowance for loan losses is sufficient to cover probable incurred credit losses at March 31, 2010.

The following table sets forth selected asset quality ratios as of the dates indicated:

 

     As of  
     March 31,
2010
    December 31,
2009
 

Allowance for loan losses to total non-covered loans

   1.56   1.48

Nonperforming assets to total non-covered assets

   1.30   1.40

Nonperforming assets total non-covered loans

   1.89   1.99

Covered Loans and Assets

Covered loans identified as impaired in accordance with ASC 310 totaled $4.9 million as of March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009. Nonaccrual loans were $3.3 million and $5.1 million at March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009, respectively. At March 31, 2010, there were two loans totaling $105 thousand that were past due 90 days or more and accruing interest, and at December 31, 2009, there were no loans past due 90 days or more and accruing interest.

In the Greater Atlantic covered portfolio we have a property with several apartment units in Georgia with a current carrying value of $310 thousand and two single family residential properties totaling $157 thousand.

Securities

Investment securities, available for sale and held to maturity, were $73.2 million at March 31, 2010 and $76.2 million at December 31, 2009.

 

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As of March 31, 2010 we owned pooled trust preferred securities as follows:

 

    Tranche   Ratings
When  Purchased
  Current Ratings           Estimated
Fair
  Current
Defaults and
 

% of Current
Defaults and

Deferrals

to Current

   

Sandler O’Neill (a)

Sterne Agee (b)

Estimated
Incremental
Defaults

Required to

   

Previously
Recognized
Cumulative

Other Comprehensive

   

Security

  Level   Moody’s   Fitch   Moody’s   Fitch   Par Value   Book Value   Value   Deferrals   Collateral     Break Yield (1)     Loss (2)  
                        (in thousands)                      

Investment Grade:

                     

ALESCO VII A1B

  Senior   Aaa   AAA   A3   A   $ 8,674   $ 7,716   $ 7,044   $ 176,056   28   $ 213,967  b    $ 328  

MMCF II B

  Senior Sub   A3   AA-   Baa2   BB     578     530     503     34,000   27     16,900  a      48  

MMCF III B

  Senior Sub   A3   A-   Baa3   B     702     685     436     27,000   23     22,100  a      17  
                                         
              9,954     8,931     7,983         $ 393  
                                         
                                                    Cumulative
Other Comprehensive
Loss (3)
  Cumulative
OTTI Related  to

Credit Loss (3)

Other Than Temporarily Impaired:

                       

TPREF FUNDING II

  Mezzanine   A1   A-   Caa3   C     1,500     478     562     115,100   33     —          780   $ 242

TRAP 2007-XII C1

  Mezzanine   A3   A   Ca   C     2,028     125     329     132,705   27     —          1,324     579

TRAP 2007-XIII D

  Mezzanine   NR   A-   NR   NR     2,032     —       —       260,250   35     —          —       2,032

MMC FUNDING XVIII

  Mezzanine   A3   A-   Ca   C     1,031     83     128     94,682   29     —          478     470

ALESCO V C1

  Mezzanine   A2   A   Ca   C     2,031     555     625     91,442   27     —          963     513

ALESCO XV C1

  Mezzanine   A3   A-   Ca   C     3,053     28     234     225,100   34     —          466     2,559

ALESCO XVI C

  Mezzanine   A3   A-   Ca   C     2,035     113     314     147,250   29     —          742     1,180
                                             
              13,710     1,382     2,192         $ 4,753   $ 7,575
                                             

Total

            $ 23,664   $ 10,313   $ 10,175          
                                     

 

(1) A break in yield for a given tranche means that defaults/deferrals have reached such a level that the tranche would not receive all of its contractual cash flows (principal and interest) by maturity (so not just a temporary interest shortfall, but an actual loss in yield on the investment). In other words, the magnitude of the defaults/deferrals has depleted all of the credit enhancement (excess interest and over-collateralization) beneath the given tranche. This represents additional defaults beyond those currently existing.
(2) Pre-tax, and represents unrealized losses at date of transfer from available-for-sale to held-to-maturity
(3) Pre-tax

We have evaluated each of these securities for potential impairment under ASC 325, and have reviewed each of the issues’ collateral participants using various techniques including the ratings provided in the Bank Financial Quarterly published by IDC Financial Publishing, Inc. We have also reviewed the interest and principal coverage of each of the tranches we own. In performing a detailed cash flow analysis of each security, we work with independent third parties to identify our best estimate of the cash flow estimated to be collected. If this estimate results in a present value of expected cash flows that is less than the amortized cost basis of a security (that is, credit loss exists), an other than temporary impairment (“OTTI”) is considered to have occurred. If there is no credit loss, any impairment is considered temporary. The cash flow analysis we performed included the following assumptions:

 

   

We assume that 2% of the remaining performing collateral will default or defer in the second quarter of 2010 and 50 basis points per annum thereafter.

 

   

We assume recoveries of 25% with a two year lag on all defaults and deferrals.

 

   

We assume no prepayments for 10 years and then 1% per annum for the remaining life of the security.

 

   

Our securities have been modeled using the above assumptions by independent third parties using the forward LIBOR curve plus original spread to discount projected cash flows to present values.

These assumptions resulted in no OTTI recognition on the trust preferred securities during the first quarter of 2010.

We also own $1.9 million of SARM 2005-22 1A2. This residential collateralized mortgage obligation was downgraded from B to CCC by Standard and Poors in September 2009, and it was downgraded from BBB to CC by Fitch in August 2009. The fair market value is $1.5 million. We have evaluated this security for potential impairment and, based on our review of the trustee report, shock analysis and current information regarding delinquencies, nonperforming loans and credit support, determined that an OTTI does exist as of March 31, 2010 in the amount of $7 thousand. The assumptions used in the analysis included a 5% prepayment speed, 10% default rate, a 50% loss severity and an accounting yield of 4.75%.

Liquidity and Funds Management

The objective of our liquidity management is to assure the ability to meet our financial obligations. These obligations include the payment of deposits on demand or at maturity, the repayment of borrowings at maturity and the ability to fund commitments and other new business

 

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opportunities. We obtain funding from a variety of sources, including customer deposit accounts, customer certificates of deposit and payments on our loans and investments. Historically, our level of core deposits has been insufficient to fully fund our lending activities. As a result, we have sought funding from additional sources, including institutional certificates of deposit and available-for-sale investment securities. In addition, we maintain lines of credit from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta and utilize securities sold under agreements to repurchase and reverse repurchase agreement borrowings from approved securities dealers.

We prepare a monthly cash flow report which forecasts weekly cash needs and availability for the coming three months, based on forecasts of loan closings from our pipeline report and other factors.

During the three months ended March 31, 2010, we funded our financial obligations with deposits, securities sold under agreements to repurchase and borrowings from the Federal Home Loan Bank of Atlanta. At March 31, 2010, we had $126.8 million of unfunded lines of credit and undisbursed construction loan funds. Our approved loan commitments were $6.8 million at March 31, 2010. Management anticipates that funding requirements for these commitments can be met from the normal sources of funds.

Capital Resources

The following table provides a comparison of our leverage and risk-weighted capital ratios and the leverage and risk-weighted capital ratios of the bank at the dates indicated to the minimum and well-capitalized regulatory standards (dollars in thousands):

 

     Actual     Required
For Capital
Adequacy Purposes
    To Be Well
Capitalized Under
Prompt Corrective
Action Provisions
 
     Amount    Ratio     Amount    Ratio     Amount    Ratio  

March 31, 2010

               

SNBV

               

Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio

   $ 88,608    21.08   $ 16,817    4.00     N/A    N/A   

Total risk-based capital ratio

     93,844    22.32     33,634    8.00     N/A    N/A   

Leverage ratio

     88,608    14.71     24,100    4.00     N/A    N/A   

Sonabank

               

Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio

   $ 85,164    20.26   $ 16,813    4.00   $ 25,219    6.00

Total risk-based capital ratio

     90,400    21.51     33,625    8.00     42,032    10.00

Leverage ratio

     85,164    14.13     24,100    4.00     30,126    5.00

December 31, 2009

               

SNBV

               

Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio

   $ 87,208    17.32   $ 20,146    4.00     N/A    N/A   

Total risk-based capital ratio

     92,380    18.34     40,292    8.00     N/A    N/A   

Leverage ratio

     87,208    17.37     20,084    4.00     N/A    N/A   

Sonabank

               

Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio

   $ 83,764    16.63   $ 20,143    4.00   $ 30,214    6.00

Total risk-based capital ratio

     88,936    17.66     40,286    8.00     50,357    10.00

Leverage ratio

     83,764    16.68     20,084    4.00     25,105    5.00

The increase in the risk-based capital ratios as of March 31, 2010 compared to December 31, 2009, is primarily the result of assigning a 20% risk weight to the assets covered under the FDIC loss-sharing agreement. A Financial Institution Letter was issued in the first quarter of 2010 which clarified that exposures that are covered under an FDIC loss-sharing agreement may be assigned a 20% risk weight.

 

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The most recent regulatory notification categorized Sonabank as well capitalized under the regulatory framework for prompt corrective action. There are no conditions or events since that notification that management believes have changed Sonabank’s category.

 

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ITEM 3 – QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

We are engaged primarily in the business of investing funds obtained from deposits and borrowings into interest-earning loans and investments. Consequently, our earnings depend to a significant extent on our net interest income, which is the difference between the interest income on loans and other investments and the interest expense on deposits and borrowings. To the extent that our interest-bearing liabilities do not reprice or mature at the same time as our interest-earning assets, we are subject to interest rate risk and corresponding fluctuations in net interest income. We have employed asset/liability management policies that seek to manage our interest income, without having to incur unacceptable levels of credit or investment risk.

We use a duration gap of equity approach to manage our interest rate risk, and we review quarterly interest sensitivity reports prepared for us by FTN Financial using the Sendero ALM Analysis System. This approach uses a model which generates estimates of the change in our market value of portfolio equity (MVPE) over a range of interest rate scenarios. MVPE is the present value of expected cash flows from assets, liabilities and off-balance sheet contracts using standard industry assumptions about estimated loan prepayment rates, reinvestment rates and deposit decay rates.

The following tables are based on an analysis prepared by FTN Financial setting forth an analysis of our interest rate risk as measured by the estimated change in MVPE resulting from instantaneous and sustained parallel shifts in the yield curve (plus or minus 300 basis points, measured in 100 basis point increments) as of March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009:

 

     Sensitivity of Market Value of Portfolio Equity
As of March 31, 2010
 
     Market Value of Portfolio Equity     Market Value of
Portfolio Equity as a % of
 

Change in Interest Rates in Basis Points (Rate Shock)

   Amount    $ Change
From Base
    % Change
From Base
    Total
Assets
    Portfolio
Equity
Book Value
 
     (Dollar amounts in thousands)  

Up 300

   $ 96,610    $ (4,432   -4.39   15.79   98.33

Up 200

     98,461      (2,581   -2.55   16.10   100.21

Up 100

     99,937      (1,105   -1.09   16.34   101.71

Base

     101,042      —        0.00   16.52   102.84

Down 100

     99,056      (1,986   -1.97   16.19   100.82

Down 200

     95,893      (5,149   -5.10   15.68   97.60

Down 300

     92,816      (8,226   -8.14   15.17   94.47

 

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Table of Contents
     Sensitivity of Market Value of Portfolio Equity
As of December 31, 2009
 
     Market Value of Portfolio Equity     Market Value of
Portfolio Equity as a % of
 

Change in Interest Rates in Basis Points (Rate Shock)

   Amount    $ Change
From Base
    % Change
From Base
    Total
Assets
    Portfolio
Equity
Book Value
 
     (Dollar amounts in thousands)  

Up 300

   $ 91,216    $ (4,877   -5.08   14.92   93.92

Up 200

     93,099      (2,994   -3.12   15.23   95.86

Up 100

     94,666      (1,427   -1.49   15.48   97.47

Base

     96,093      —        0.00   15.72   98.94

Down 100

     94,855      (1,238   -1.29   15.51   97.66

Down 200

     92,570      (3,523   -3.67   15.14   95.31

Down 300

     89,569      (6,524   -6.79   14.65   92.22

Our interest rate sensitivity is also monitored by management through the use of a model run by FTN Financial that generates estimates of the change in the net interest income over a range of interest rate scenarios. Net interest income depends upon the relative amounts of interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities and the interest rates earned or paid on them. In this regard, the model assumes that the composition of our interest sensitive assets and liabilities existing at March 31, 2010 and December 31, 2009 remains constant over the period being measured and also assumes that a particular change in interest rates is reflected uniformly across the yield curve regardless of the duration to maturity or repricing of specific assets and liabilities.

 

     Sensitivity of Net Interest Income
As of March 31, 2010
 
     Adjusted Net Interest Income    Net Interest Margin  

Change in Interest Ratesin Basis Points (Rate Shock)

   Amount    $ Change
From Base
   Percent     % Change
From Base
 
     (Dollar amounts in thousands)  

Up 300

   $ 25,321    $ 2,846    4.53   0.49

Up 200

     24,425      1,950    4.38   0.34

Up 100

     23,507      1,032    4.22   0.18

Base

     22,475      —      4.04   0.00

Down 100

     23,235      760    4.17   0.13

Down 200

     23,334      859    4.19   0.15

Down 300

     23,313      838    4.18   0.14

 

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     Sensitivity of Net Interest Income
As of December 31, 2009
 
     Adjusted Net Interest Income    Net Interest Margin  

Change in Interest Ratesin Basis Points (Rate Shock)

   Amount    $ Change
From Base
   Percent     % Change
From Base
 
     (Dollar amounts in thousands)  

Up 300

   $ 26,288    $ 2,814    4.45   0.47

Up 200

     25,358      1,884    4.30   0.32

Up 100

     24,392      918    4.14   0.16

Base

     23,474      —      3.98   0.00

Down 100

     24,214      740    4.11   0.13

Down 200

     24,240      766    4.11   0.13

Down 300

     24,208      734    4.11   0.13

Certain shortcomings are inherent in the methodology used in the above interest rate risk measurements. Modeling changes in MVPE requires the making of certain assumptions that may or may not reflect the manner in which actual yields and costs respond to changes in market interest rates. Accordingly, although the MVPE tables and Sensitivity of Net Interest Income tables provide an indication of our interest rate risk exposure at a particular point in time, such measurements are not intended to, and do not, provide a precise forecast of the effect of changes in market interest rates on our net worth and net interest income.

 

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ITEM 4 – CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

As of the end of the period covered by this quarterly report on Form 10-Q under the supervision and with the participation of management, including our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, we have evaluated the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a – 15(e) and 15d – 15(c) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934). Based on that evaluation, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer have concluded that these controls and procedures are effective as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. There were no significant changes in our internal controls or in other factors that could significantly affect these controls subsequent to the date of their evaluation.

Disclosure controls and procedures are our controls and other procedures that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by us in the reports that we file or submit under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our principal executive officer and principal financial officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

ITEM 1 – LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

While SNBV and Sonabank may, from time to time, be a party to various legal proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business, there are no proceedings pending, or to management’s knowledge, threatened, against SNBV or Sonabank at this time.

ITEM 1A – RISK FACTORS

As of March 31, 2010 there were no material changes to the risk factors previously disclosed on our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2009.

ITEM 2. – UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS

Not applicable

ITEM 3. – DEFAULTS UPON SENIOR SECURITIES

Not applicable

ITEM 4. – (REMOVED AND RESERVED)

ITEM 5. – OTHER INFORMATION

Not applicable

 

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Table of Contents

ITEM 6 – EXHIBITS

(a) Exhibits.

 

Exhibit No.

  

Description

31.1*  

   Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

31.2*  

   Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

32.1**

   Certification of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

* Filed with this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q
** Furnished with this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q

 

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Signatures

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned thereunto duly authorized.

 

    Southern National Bancorp of Virginia, Inc.
   

(Registrant)

May 14, 2010    

/s/ Georgia S. Derrico

      (Date)     Georgia S. Derrico,
    Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer
May 14, 2010    

/s/ William H. Lagos

      (Date)     William H. Lagos,
    Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

 

35

Exhibit 31.1

CERTIFICATIONS

I, Georgia S. Derrico, certify that:

1. I have reviewed this report on Form 10-Q of Southern National Bancorp of Virginia, Inc.;

2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

4. The registrant’s other certifying officers and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) for the registrant and we have:

 

  a) designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

 

  b) designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

 

  c) evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

 

  d) disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

5. The registrant’s other certifying officers and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

 

  a) all significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

 

  b) any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Date: May 14, 2010    
   

/s/ Georgia S. Derrico

   

Georgia S. Derrico,

Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer

 

36

Exhibit 31.2

CERTIFICATIONS

I, William H. Lagos, certify that:

1. I have reviewed this report on Form 10-Q of Southern National Bancorp of Virginia, Inc.;

2. Based on my knowledge, this report does not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made, in light of the circumstances under which such statements were made, not misleading with respect to the period covered by this report;

3. Based on my knowledge, the financial statements, and other financial information included in this report, fairly present in all material respects the financial condition, results of operations and cash flows of the registrant as of, and for, the periods presented in this report;

4. The registrant’s other certifying officers and I are responsible for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e)) and internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) for the registrant and we have:

 

  a) designed such disclosure controls and procedures, or caused such disclosure controls and procedures to be designed under our supervision, to ensure that material information relating to the registrant, including its consolidated subsidiaries, is made known to us by others within those entities, particularly during the period in which this report is being prepared;

 

  b) designed such internal control over financial reporting, or caused such internal control over financial reporting to be designed under our supervision, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles;

 

  c) evaluated the effectiveness of the registrant’s disclosure controls and procedures and presented in this report our conclusions about the effectiveness of the disclosure controls and procedures, as of the end of the period covered by this report based on such evaluation; and

 

  d) disclosed in this report any change in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the registrant’s most recent fiscal quarter (the registrant’s fourth fiscal quarter in the case of an annual report) that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting; and

5. The registrant’s other certifying officers and I have disclosed, based on our most recent evaluation of internal control over financial reporting, to the registrant’s auditors and the audit committee of the registrant’s board of directors (or persons performing the equivalent functions):

 

  a) all significant deficiencies and material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal control over financial reporting which are reasonably likely to adversely affect the registrant’s ability to record, process, summarize and report financial information; and

 

  b) any fraud, whether or not material, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the registrant’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

Date: May 14, 2010    
   

/s/ William H. Lagos

    William H. Lagos,
    Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

 

37

Exhibit 32.1

CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO 18 U.S.C. SECTION 1350 AS ADOPTED PURSUANT TO SECTION 906 OF THE SARBANES-OXLEY ACT OF 2002

In connection with the Quarterly Report of Southern National Bancorp of Virginia, Inc. (“SNBV”) on Form 10-Q for the period ending March 31, 2010 as filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on the date hereof (the “Report”), the undersigned Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial officer of SNBV hereby certify, pursuant to 18 U.S.C. §1350, as adopted pursuant to §906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 that based on their knowledge and belief: 1) the Report fully complies with the requirements of Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, and 2) the information contained in the Report fairly presents, in all material respects, the financial condition and results of operations of SNBV as of and for the periods covered in the Report.

 

/s/ Georgia S. Derrico

Georgia S. Derrico, Chief Executive Officer

/s/ William H. Lagos

William H. Lagos, Chief Financial Officer
May 14, 2010

 

38